Tag Archives: Uva And Uvb

Star Trekking Into Darkness Isn’t The Only Way To Avoid Sun Exposure

You dudes see what I did there?

How I used a really cool film that’s coming out today to sort of talk about my actual topic? Not that I’m trolling for click bait or anything like that. It’s not like I’m mentioning sex or nudity or naked or something like that in the third sentence.

heh

Anyway, let’s get the last of this sunscreen out of the bottle and onto the blog.

There is, according to the American Academy of Dermatology, a right way and a wrong way to apply sunscreen so you don’t get burned. Who knew?

I figured just slathering it on until you could slide down a grass-covered hill at full speed was the way to go. And the grass leaves would scrape off the excess. Of course, that left grease tracks in the steep hills and killed the grass, but hey. . . That’s just the way we roll. See what I did there? A punne, or play on words?

Let’s head on over to listen to the fine skin doctors at the American Academy of Dermatology before I speak another horrible punne and really deserve punishment.

We’ve already talked about how the sunscreen you should be using should have a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 30 and be broad spectrum to block out ultraviolet A and B rays (UVA and UVB). The next thing you need to know is that you’ve got to start slathering yourself up well before you head outdoors.

Apply sunscreen generously before going outdoors. It takes approximately 15 minutes for your skin to absorb the sunscreen and protect you. If you wait until you are in the sun to apply sunscreen, your skin is unprotected and can burn.

Which means you also need to make darn sure you cover every bit of exposed skin if you want the benefit of sunscreen. I mean, if you do most of the body and then leave, say, an unprotected stripe down the side of your torso where your arm would be if it weren’t in constant motion playing beach volleyball — just to pull an instance out of the air — it can really, really, really hurt.

Even worse, getting a severe sunburn can be bad news for future you. Damaging your skin with major doses of UVA and UVB can lead to more of a chance of skin cancer. Cover up. Get slathered. And make sure you use enough of the right kind of sunscreen.

Now watch this cool public service video. I’m sure it’s not corny at all.


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Taking A Break From The Sun

by Richard

There’s that old saying about something being as smooth as a baby’s bottom. That means something is very smooth and soft. Not because it is wet and sticky and smelly. They’re talking post change, not pre change.

Anyway, baby skin is so smooth and soft because the only thing it’s been exposed to was a nice nutrient-packed bath for nine months or so, followed by pampering and suchlike.

As opposed to, say, older dudes who have done things to their skin, horrible things. Who here hasn’t made a long, sliding dive into gravel? Or on the asphalt? Or worked with lawn tools or just plain tools long enough that you start developing blisters? Yeah, I didn’t think I’d see any hands up with those questions.

However, one thing babys definitely have over us in the race for soft skin, is that theirs hasn’t been damaged by the sun for almost every day of every week of every month of every day of their lives.

It’s only relatively recently that people have begun to recognize the importance of protecting our skin from the sun’s Ultraviolet A and Ultraviolet B rays. UVA and UVB are what cause sunburn and blisters.

Fortunately, there is a better protection for our skin than sweating it out in long sleeves and long pants, or staying indoors with the curtains drawn all day. It’s called sunscreen.

We’re supposed to be using it every day, according to dermatologists. I’d love to, but I have a constitutional aversion to walking around all day feeling greasy.

Little dudes, on the other hand, don’t get much say in the matter. In addition to having delicate skin that really needs to be protected as much as possible. That’s where we come in.

You need to make sure you’ve added some good sunscreen to the little dude’s diaper bag before you go out. There’s two types of sunscreen, ones that block the sun’s rays from being absorbed and ones that destroy the damaging rays after they’ve become absorbed. It’s those last kinds that are known to cause stinking. And, dude, believe me, you don’t want to be the one who puts the stinging kind of sunscreen onto a little dude’s face. That is not fun.

Try to find a sunscreen that is designed to physically block the sun’s damaging rays, one that will not sting and one that is intentionally formulated to be used on the face. It’s not that hard, but we’ll leave that as an exercise for the student to complete.

While you do need to make sure you cover your little dude’s face well with the sunscreen, you don’t have to trowel it on. Just get a good, even coat. Try to apply it every day, especially during the summer. Just as important, try and keep the little dudette out of the most powerful sun’s rays, between 10 am and 4 pm. That’s a bad time for soft, fragile skin to be out and about.

After all, we want that skin to stay smooth and soft for as long as possible.

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