Tag Archives: Monkey

Sunday Serenade: First Of May

I’m a little bit late with this one. Sue me.

Jonathan Coulton is a great indie singer/songwriter. He’s mostly known among the geeknoceti for songs such as re: Your Brains and Codemonkey.

With spring well upon us and the warmer weather finally setting up camp for the long visit that is summer in the south, I thought it was time to help celebrate a little bit of that.

With that, let’s all settle back and listen to Coulton’s First of May, a decidedly not-safe-for-work song that celebrates the coming of spring. If you know what I mean?

Nudge, nudge. Wink, wink. A nod’s as good as a wink to a blind bat, eh?

Enjoy.


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Walking The Walk As A Role Model

Actions scream louder than words.

So clichéd, but so very true.

You can tell your little dudes all day to be honest and always tell the truth. However, when they see you lie your way out of a speeding ticket, or tell your boss you won’t be coming in that day because you’re *cough* not feeling good, they will learn from your actions and not your lectures.

You, all right? I learned it by watching you.

As goofy as that PSA is (and, really, can we take anything seriously when there’s that sort of mustache in frame and it’s not being mocked mercilessly?*), there is a good point buried beneath the moralizing and hippie-hate.

In fact, let’s add on another couple of clichés that might have something to say about the matter: Seeing is believing. Monkey see, monkey do. I’ll believe it when I see it.

Young dudes and dudettes are sponges, by which I mean that they soak up the world around them, internalize what they experience and then squeeze it back out into the world through their own nascent personalities. Not that they’re yellow, with holes in them and live in a pineapple under the sea. Although I would have thought that would be self-evident.

Moving on.

Once they get past toddlerhood, most young dudes and dudettes experience their parents’ words in much the same way that we experience the words of an adult in a Charlie Brown cartoon.

“Waaah, wah-wah waaahh wah-wah wah wah.”

It has about all the semantic content of a bag of broken bricks.

But those eyes. . . Those eyes see everything.** Those ears hear everything.°

And we all know from experience (The one time you say the unmodified frak in front of your young dude, it’s what he’s going to remember and repeat. Again and again. In front of your in-laws.), that they will catch you in a contradiction. There’s no question about it. Do what you warned them not to do and they will call you on it.

Personally, I find the old excuse that we’re allowed to do (whatever it is) because we’re adults to be somewhat lacking in conviction. Lying — for the most part — is wrong no matter the age. It’s only as we get older that we begin to justify as a social necessity the idea of shading the truth.

I mention all this because, right now, I’m having a hard time showing my young dudes the right way to attack life and I fully understand the consequences of blowing this one.

Footnotes & Errata

* No. No, we can’t. That is a seriously scary mustache.
** Except the pile of freshly laundered, dried and folded clothing at the bottom of the stairs waiting for them to take up and put away.
° Except our voices when we’re asking them to take out the trash, or clean up their room, or to clean out the food mouldering under their bed.

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Replay The Day But Be Smart About It

Today is the annual Bill Murray Appreciation Day.

Otherwise known as Groundhog Day. Murray stars in the wonderfully daft and philosophic movie of the same name and today being the actual Groundhog Day, I use it as an excuse to rewatch the movie again and again.Bill Murray, Groundhog Day and the movies. Also predestination and fate.

To get into the spirit, mind.

So, Happy Groundhog Day to all of you who actually care about that sort of thing.

Personally, I think if there were any chance that a groundhog seeing or not seeing his/her shadow had any sort of effect on long-term global weather patterns, we’d be living in a much stranger place indeed.

So, instead, let’s talk about idiots.

Some computer boffins decided to do a little sifting through the detritus of bad computer acts. That is, with all the recent information thefts (Target, etc) lately, we have access to a lot of information about a lot of people.

And that includes the passwords these people use when they want to secure something on their computer. Which is what the computer wallas went looking for. And, dudes, you’ll never guess what they found. Or maybe you will considering I actually started this bit talking about idiots.

The most popular password, according to the folks at SplashData, and the worst on the internet is a new one. It unseated “password,” which was the top baddest last year.

Drumroll, please. . . .

The most popular password and the worst on the internet is. . . “123456”. I kid you not.

Here’s where you may feel free to point and laugh.

It’s not that hard, dudes. All you’ve got to do is have a place where you can keep the passwords and the sites to which they belong. Heck, any halfway decent web browser will come equipped with software already installed to create difficult-to-guess passwords and then store them for you.

And yet. . . And yet. . .

Anyway, I’m going to leave you today with SplashData’s top (bottom) 25 worst passwords on the internet for 2013.

Presenting SplashData’s “Worst Passwords of 2013”:

Rank Password Change from 2012

1

123456

Up 1

2

password

Down 1

3

12345678

Unchanged

4

qwerty

Up 1

5

abc123

Down 1

6

123456789

New

7

111111

Up 2

8

1234567

Up 5

9

iloveyou

Up 2

10

adobe123

New

11

123123

Up 5

12

admin

New

13

1234567890

New

14

letmein

Down 7

15

photoshop

New

16

1234

New

17

monkey

Down 11

18

shadow

Unchanged

19

sunshine

Down 5

20

12345

New

21

password1

Up 4

22

princess

New

23

azerty

New

24

trustno1

Down 12

25

000000

New


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