Tag Archives: Long Long Time

More Google-Eyed Gazing, Of A More Earth-Bound Nature

It’s picture time again, dudes.

This time, though, I’d like to thank the fine folks at National Geographic for the beautiful eye candy we’re about to start drooling over. I’ve loved National Geographic magazine for a long, long time and it wasn’t just for the pictures of the naked tribeswomen that sometimes ran between the covers.

Yes, I know it’s a cliché, but they only get like that because they’re true. Hey, they didn’t have the internet or VHS tapes when I was a young dude. We had to make do.

Anyway. Back to the topic of discussion.

It’s National Geographic. For decades, the magazine has been the place to go if you wanted to see awesome photography. And that hasn’t changed. Just check some of these.

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Gorgeous, isn’t it? It’s a stunning photograph of a climber named Cory Richards. He and his fellow climbers made their way through winds strong enough to be classed as a hurricane and shivered through temps as low as -50°F just to reach the summit of Gasherbrum II.

It’s only one of the many spectacular photographs that are on the National Geographic website and are part of a series of photos called The New Age of Exploration.

Basically, the contention of this photo series is that mankind has been bred to see what is over the horizon, what’s around the next bend, and what’s at the top of the highest mountain. We just can’t help ourselves. It’s who we are.

And, to prove it, National Geographic went out and collected some of the most amazing photos from around the world to document our love of exploration. Of course there are photographs from the various moon landings and pictures of the Earth as seen from Mars, but there is so much more.

The wonderful thing about this is that it gives us a chance to see just how amazing and beautiful our home really is. We constantly are surrounded by astonishing beauty, vistas to blind the unwary eye, and all sorts of stupefyingly outrageous things on both the micro and macro scale.

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National Geographic goes everywhere. I got the picture to the left from a gallery of Exploring the Deepest Recesses of the Planet. That’s Fangtooth, a fish found deep in the ocean, 6,500 feet deep in the ocean. That’s a long, long way down.

So if you’ve got a few minutes, why not head over to the National Geographic site and just flip through. I guarantee you will find something to astonish you, something you will just have to share.

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Another Peek At The Future

by Richard

The future keeps breaking through into the present, usually in ways we never thought it would.

For instance, today I’m getting ready to take Sarcasmo on a trip to Idaho for a look at another bit of education. I’m coming back. He’s not.

Hyper Lad is away at Camp Cheerio.

The only one of the young dudes still home is Zippy the Monkey Boy, who just returned from a near-month-long trip to Fiji, New Zealand and Australia (makes me wish I was one of my own kids) and is getting ready to head off to the University of North Carolina Wilmington in just about a month.

So we’re down to one kid, two adults, two cats, a dog and a bird.

Yeah, the nest officially is getting a little bit emptier.

Especially considering Zippy the Monkey Boy is the type to sleep in until someone goes into his room and tips his bed over onto the floor. Mornings are going to be pretty quiet for the next little while.

I guess it’s something I’ll have to get used to.

When school starts up Aug. 27, it’s going to be quite real and quite quiet.

Hyper Lad is off to school by 8:30 am and that’s it. Nothing to do with kids until he gets home near 5 pm.

Still not sure how this is going to work. I mean, I haven’t had to cook for only three people (one child) for a long, long time. I have a feeling I’m going to be making a lot of accidental leftovers for the first couple of months.

Maybe I can buy that huge storage fridge I’ve had my eye on for a while. Get a place to put the stuff away . . . Well, realistically, never look at it again. Making leftovers? Yeah, I’m good at that. Serving leftovers? Not so much.

Of course, with Zippy the Monkey Boy leaving the house, our grocery bill will almost immediately come down a substantial amount since I’ll no longer have to buy his, and his alone, normal ration of 2.5 gallons of milk per week.

Ah well. That’s in the future, which is only waving hi this week. I’m sure it’ll be coming for a much longer visit next month.

Until then. . .

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Ook, Ook To The Monkey Boy

by Richard

Look out, world. Today is the day Zippy the Monkey Boy turns 18.

It’s the day he’s been looking forward to for a long, long time. He likes to think that, just because the law considers him an adult now, that he’ll be treated like an adult here at Casa de Dude.

His mom and I don’t like to disillusion him* about stuff like this, but he’s really not going to be treated as if he’s a house guest. Okay, we’ll probably not cut up his food and wipe his mouth for him, but he’s still a kid in our hearts.

At least until he’s the one who pays for dinner when we go out, but that’s a separate thing entirely.

Today, we come to praise Zippy the Monkey Boy, not to bury him.

With a name like Zippy the Monkey Boy, you’d think he was the one who was always running around, knocking things over and flinging poop all over the walls. He was. But that wasn’t why he got the name. He got the name because he took to climbing like greased-up pigs take to sliding.

He never did learn to crawl. Instead, he kept low crawling until he could stand up and walk. He wanted the extra height, you see.

Once he got up on two feet, it was only a matter of time until he started seeing the fences and stuff we’d put up around the play area, not as a thing blocking his way so he’d better turn around, but as another toy, something we put there so he could have fun climbing and dropping.

That was what we listened to when he was a baby. That thump. We’d hear it and know he’d found his way over another obstacle and we should be expecting his arrival any moment. Diapers were a wonderful thing for Zippy the Monkey Boy. Great cushion. Of course, if it were already a full diaper before he climbed and dropped, we got to clean a lot of flung stuff after.

He’s kept it up. One of my favorite pictures of him shows him high up in a tree, screaming out his triumph for having climbed that high. He was 15 when we took that picture. He likes to climb is what I’m saying.

His other most distinguishing feature through the years has been his love of animals. This is a little dude that has wanted to be a zoologist since he knew someone could actually tell people he was going to study animals all his life and people would be okay with it. Now he’s going off to one of the best marine science schools in the country so he can make the study of sharks his life work. If nothing else, it shows he’s able to find a goal and stick with it.

Zippy the Monkey Boy is getting ready to head off to Wilmington to try his act out down there, along the beaches, among the co-eds and out on his (metaphorical) own. Sure I’m worried.

But only a little. I have the feeling Zippy the Monkey Boy is going to keep on climbing, always reaching for something just out of his reach and finding a way to get it and then seeing the next thing just a little higher up.

It’s been an adventurous 18 years. I can’t wait to see what the next 18 bring.

Ook, Ook, Zip.

*no, that’s a lie. We love disillusioning him. It’s such fun.

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