Tag Archives: Citizens

Where In The World. . .

Learning geography doesn’t have to be boring.

Although, honestly, dudes, just typing that sentence above has me yawning. Stuffing your head full of facts and figures and geospatial relationships can put anything to sleep, no matter the caffeine dose or the biochemical load of stimulants.

Or so I’ve heard.

From other people.

Moving on.

Despite the boredom inherent in the academic learning of geography, the global citizens of today (that’s you folks and your young dudettes and young dudes) need to know more than the nearest neighborhood. It helps to understand that when news talking heads are discussing Ukraine and Russia fighting, we know where they are in relation to each other.

The best way I’ve found to instill a if not love of, then tolerance for geography, is maps.

My dad and his wife travel. A lot. What I like to do is find where they’re going to be and then do a little research. My young dudes used to talk with their grandfather before he set off, he’d tell them where he was going and then they’d hit the maps with me to find the country.

We would look at that country’s information and physical layout to think about what he might want to do while he’s there, or what other countries he might want to visit.

The young dudes actually loved doing that and still, to this day, remember some interesting facts about various countries that had played host to their grandfather, yet still exist today.

You don’t have to have a globetrotting relative to play this game, though. While watching some of the World Cup matches, I realized we could be doing the same sort of game, only with countries participating in the tournament.brasila_1000

The good folks at Wired Magazine had the same idea. They went out and secured satellite pictures of every country participating.

That’s Brazil, by the way. It’s a nice little travelogue flipping through the various satellite images. Get your little dudes with you when you sit down to look and see what questions you can answer.

Who knows? You might even learn a thing or three.

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Memorial Day 2014

Take a moment to remember.

Here in America, today is set aside to remember and honor those who gave their lives in the service of this country.

As far as I know, Memorial Day is supposed to be reserved for those who died while in the armed forces, but I like to think that it includes all those who were working to make our country a better place.

Yes, it’s a broad definition, but I like it. Mostly because it means that killing people isn’t the only definition of greatness.

While you dudes are out at the cookout, or enjoying the warmth of late spring/early summer or doing whatever it is you’re doing instead of being at work, do take a little time to remember those who went before.

Talk to your little dudes about why they’re out of school.

You might also want to consider how you can honor the lives that have gone toward making our country a better place to live. Carrying on that sort of work sounds like the best way to me.

Make our country a better place for all its citizens*. Restore its justification to act as a moral beacon to the world.

Today isn’t only about getting a day off work or a day out of school.

Remember. Act. Improve.

Footnotes & Errata

* You have no idea how tempted I was to insert a blatantly political paragraph/rant here. I think I might have given myself an aneurysm from stopping my fingers. Ow.

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Dude Review: Dhalgren By Samuel R. Delaney

Gravity’s Rainbow by Thomas Pinchon is one of the most difficult books I’ve ever tried to read. There are those who compare it to Ulysses by James Joyce in that the path does not follow a very linear narrative and the reader must work to even come close to understanding what’s going on.

I, however, am not one of those who compares those two books. To me, Gravity’s Rainbow most closely resembles (in spirit, alone, certainly not in plot or character) Dhalgren by Samuel R. Delaney.

Samuel R Delaney is one of the greatest living masters of the science-fiction novel, having written award-winning stories like Babel-17 and Dhalgren.
The man can certainly rock a beard, yeah?

One of American science fiction’s greatest living writers, Delaney has created masterwork after masterwork, each more controversial than the last, each examining racial, sexual and personal identity and how each relates to the outer society.

Often described as the most literary of science-fiction writers, Delaney isn’t fascinated by the economic impact that instantaneous, inexpensive teleportation would create. Instead, he’d rather look at the different ways in which the new technology allows men and women to indulge their more. . . slippery. . . impulses.

A man fascinated by the mechanics of the physical act of sex and the emotional aspects of love and hate, Delaney is one of those rare authors who can define or create a genre simply by going ahead and writing whatever the heck is in his head that day.

I’ve long meant to go back and try and read Dhalgren again, having run up against a brick wall the last time I attempted a read through. (Hey, I was in my teens and a callow youth. Gimme a break.)

So imagine my joy when I found out that I could get one of the first electronic copies of Dhalgren, made available through the good folks at NetGalley, which is a place where publishers can give out advance copies of their book in return for an honest review.

I got the book and the review is coming in just a second. After this, in fact. A quick plug that Dhalgren  and eight other Delaney classics are now available for the first time as electronic books, including the Nebula Award­-winning Babel-17, as well as Delany¹s Hugo Award-winning literary memoir, The Motion of Light in Water,  from online booksellers all over the world.

So. Dhalgren. This was a difficult read when I was younger. That, at least, hasn’t changed. Full of digressive runs and almost stream-of-consciousness narration, Dhalgren tells the story of the Kid, a mostly unknown ambisexual man, with very little memory of his past or his identity, recently arrived in the city of Bellona.

Bellona is located in the geographic center of the United States. The book opens some time after an unspecified . . . something happens that drives away most of the citizens of the city, leaving behind only madmen, criminals, the deliriously inane and the Kid.

As with so many young people, the Kid is searching for answers to the perennial questions of “Who am I?” “Why am I here?” and “What’s the point of it all?” Who, at one time or another, hasn’t asked those questions?

It’s possibly one reason that this book has such a demented pull on the minds of so many people. Despite the difficulty in reading this dense, interweaving narrative, there’s something about it that keeps drawing me back to it.

I did get through the end, although it wasn’t easy and I know I didn’t get from the book everything I should. The last part of the book consisted of “found texts,” excerpts from other texts, the equivalent of footnotes and other variations on traditional narrative take away whatever sense of temporal progress that had been gained earlier.

Dhalgren is without a doubt one of the most ambitious books published in many, many years. And, while I’m ready to admit to you dudes that it could be just me, I’ve the feeling that Delaney might have reached for something a bit to far for him to grasp this time.

Still, it’s not like I felt my time wrestling with Dhalgren was wasted. It wasn’t. I eventually made my way through Gravity’s Rainbow and managed to learn a bit about it with each attempt.

I have a feeling Dhalgren is going to be my next literary obsession, a book that I will return to and do battle with, over the next few years. It is a battle I anticipate with a great deal of excitement.

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